What is Urge Incontinence and How to Cure it?

Updated: May 19, 2019



People who have a normal bladder will hold urine until they get the bathroom, but people with urge incontinence leak if they don't get to the toilet quickly. Having to urinate frequently is urinary #incontinence (called Overactive bladder). So if you have a sudden, intense desire to urinate accompanied by the sudden impulse to urinate and/or pee frequently, including throughout the night you have urge incontinence. Urge incontinence may be caused by a medical condition including infection, neurological problem, or an easily correctable condition of weak pelvic floor muscles.


How Does The Urinary System Work?



The urinary structure — which includes the kidneys, ureters, sac and urethra — is in charge of removing material from the body through urine. The kidneys, located toward those place in the high stomach, make urine by filtering material and substance from the blood. The urine then travels through the ureters to the bladder, where the urine is stored until you will empty your bladder.

However, if you have a neurological problem, messages will not be sent to your brain correctly, if you have a bladder infection, you will not be able to control your urge to urinate and you need to see a doctor to get the right kind of antibiotics to get rid of it. If your urge incontinence is caused by weak pelvic floor muscles, you have options:

Natural remedies such as pelvic floor exercises to improve your pelvic floor strength, surgery to restore pelvic floor muscles that are damaged or weakened and Biofeedback retraining.


Pelvic Floor Exercises

See an effective pelvic exercise that is NOT a kegel demonstrated from 30 Day Bladder Fix on PBS TV



Natural urge incontinence remedies help you regain ability to control your urine, are very effective and if you opt for at home pelvic floor exercises and simple diet changes you will find that you can manage your urge incontinence without any side effects or medical bills.

You may have heard of kegel exercises as a way to get rid of urge incontinence. However, to truly eliminate the constant need to urinate, you need to a complete pelvic floor exercise program. So if you've tried kegels and that didn't work for you, now you can try some other options like using a pelvic floor workout routine. Studies show that pelvic floor exercises are as effective as surgery without the risk.


Surgery for Urge Incontinence

Surgery may change or heal incontinence if it is caused by a problem , e.g., the change in the position of the bladder or obstruction because of an enlarged prostate. Standard surgery for incontinence involves moving the bladder up to secure it in place. When stress incontinence is severe, the doctor may put in a mesh.


What is Mesh Surgery?

This transvaginal mesh operation is done for Pelvic Organ Prolapse and Urinary Incontinence. With so many women who've had the operation, there have been a percentage of women who reported complication that have lead to drastic health disorders.

Tens of thousands of patients suffering from pelvic organ prolapse / urinary incontinence underwent mesh surgery. While some women did not have any complications, around 100,000 women have had severe physical injuries and emotional pain as a result of the surgery. Whis the mesh is still being used, it is a high-risk medical device. The victims of these faulty products often had financial hardships because of the medical expenses and time away from work. Furthermore, the condition can be worse after surgery if a patient experiences complications. Like any major surgery, you really need to be knowledgeable about your risk factors and consider your options. A good doctor will always tell you to try conservative measures first: meaning options that don't require surgery.

The best treatment for pelvic strength is to use a combination of psychodynamic and cognitive therapies.


What is Biofeedback Training?

Biofeedback creates a higher reduction in female urinary incontinence. Overall, the medical profession suggests that pelvic strength practices and different behavioural strategies, with or without biofeedback, can help or decrease incontinence. However, the highest benefit is derived from any pelvic strength rehabilitation and training system when ongoing stimulation and counseling, such as biofeedback therapy, are allowed.

Biofeedback is a way that enables people to increase self-awareness and personal power through physiologic response which may include monitoring of how often you go to the bathroom and behavior retraining to train your bladder and increase your bladder control.


Urge Incontinence Medications

Medicines for people with bladder control issues marked by sudden, extreme urinary impulses and urine discharge are available.

For urge incontinence, medicines recognized as anticholinergics/antimuscarinics (Detrol, Ditropan XL, Enablex, Oxytrol, Urispas, and Vesicare) help prevent leaks. Oxytrol, Detrol, Ditropan XL, Myrbetriq, and Vesicare. Botox injected into the bladder strength stimulates the bladder to unwind, increasing your ability to store urinae shortening episodes of urinary incontinence. Medications are not always effective, but may help to decrease accidents while you are doing a pelvic floor exercise program. With the end goal being, to get you're muscles strong enough so that you won't need bladder medications anymore.

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References

Qaseem, A; Dallas, P; Forciea, MA; Starkey, M; Denberg, TD; Shekelle, P; for the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of, Physicians (Sep 16, 2014). "Nonsurgical Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians". Annals of Internal Medicine. 161 (6): 429–440. doi:10.7326/m13-2410. PMID 25222388. 

Qaseem, A; Dallas, P; Forciea, MA; Starkey, M; Denberg, TD; Shekelle, P; for the Clinical Guidelines Committee of the American College of, Physicians (Sep 16, 2014). "Nonsurgical Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians". Annals of Internal Medicine. 161 (6): 429–440. doi:10.7326/m13-2410. PMID 25222388. 

Shamliyan, T; Wyman, JF; Ramakrishnan, R; Sainfort, F; Kane, RL (Jun 19, 2012). "Benefits and harms of pharmacologic treatment for urinary incontinence in women: a systematic review". Annals of Internal Medicine. 156 (12): 861–74. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-156-12-201206190-00436. PMID 22711079. 

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